Experienced Employment Law Attorneys in Winston-Salem, NC

Has your work experience been unfair or harmful? Have you faced discrimination, wage theft, retaliation, or harassment? If so, you may be able to file a legal claim and recover compensation.

Employers have an obligation to provide a safe workplace and follow all federal and state labor laws. These laws involve wage obligations, such as minimum wage and overtime, and protect employees from discrimination, harassment, wrongful termination (exceptions to NC’s at-will employment laws), and some forms of retaliation. 

Nevertheless, North Carolina employers continue to intentionally or mistakenly violate labor laws. When a violation of employment laws in the Winston Salem area harms you physically, emotionally, or financially, you deserve compensation.

A Winston Salem employment lawyer can help you right the wrong you experienced by filing a workplace legal claim.

At EMP Law, we’ve earned a reputation for fighting for employees and are veteran practitioners in the field of employment law. See examples of where we’ve fought for the underdog, and won. We can help you recover the workplace compensation you deserve. Contact us online or call (336) 724-2828 today for assistance.

What Does an Employment Attorney for Employees in Winston Salem Do?

An employment lawyer for employees in Winston Salem, NC, helps workers recover compensation or address the harm they suffer in the workplace. When you contact a Winston Salem employment lawyer, they will take these steps to help you.

Meet for a Consultation

First, you’ll meet with a lawyer for a consultation. At this initial meeting, you can explain how you were mistreated at work and discuss any evidence you have. The attorney will explain applicable laws and answer your questions. The attorney may also discuss fees and give you a potential timeframe for resolving your claim.

Gather Information

If you retain EMP Law, they will begin to research and investigate your claim. If needed, the attorney may hire an investigator to find additional evidence.

File a Claim

Depending on the nature of your claim, your attorney may file a claim with the EEOC, the North Carolina Department of Labor, or in federal or state court. Your attorney will explain the legal strategy for your case before taking any action.

Negotiate a Settlement

Throughout the process, and with your input, your attorney may attempt to negotiate a settlement to resolve your claim. If your employer is unwilling to offer an agreeable settlement, you and your attorney can discuss the next steps, including initiating legal action. 

When Should You Contact an Employment Lawyer?

If your employer permits a work environment that harms you physically, emotionally, or financially, you should first report the matter to them. Discuss the issue with your employer and provide details about the conduct and activity that you believe is in violation of your rights or the law. In many cases, your employer will have a duty to investigate your report. Sometimes, a simple conversation can take care of the issue. Your employer may willingly pay you overdue wages, take appropriate action related to a personnel matter, or otherwise proactively address your complaint.

However, if reporting the incident to your employer does not resolve things, you should consider taking further action. To protect yourself, you should file a claim with a federal or state agency or in court, depending on the nature of your harm. Employment laws are complex, and you may find it difficult to determine where to file a claim. If you are confused, need advice, or prefer an experienced lawyer to handle your claim, contact our employment lawyers in Winston Salem.

Call (336) 724-2828 or send us an online message today to get started.

Meet Our Winston-Salem, NC Employment Law Attorneys

Our North Carolina employment lawyers have decades of combined experience helping wronged workers.

Employment Matters We Handle

We have successfully helped our clients in a range of employment-related issues, including:

Discrimination (Race, Sex, Disability, Age, Religion, National Origin or Pregnancy)

If you feel that you were the victim of discrimination based on your race, sex, disability, religion, national origin, or pregnancy, and your employer has 15 or more employees, or based on your age and your employer has 20 or more employees, you may file a charge of discrimination with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), a federal agency which enforces laws against discrimination.

You may start the charge filing process by contacting your local EEOC office and relating the facts of your case to the EEOC investigators. The deadline for filing a charge is 180 days from notice of the discriminatory act (whether it is a notice of termination, failure to promote, denial of benefits, or some other adverse action during your employment relationship).

If you intend to file a charge of discrimination, you should do so at once. If you wish to have a consultation concerning potential discrimination, please don’t hesitate to reach out to us today.

To file a charge contact the office of the EEOC closest to you:

Raleigh, NC:

434 Fayetteville St, Suite 700

Raleigh, NC 27601

(919) 856-4064

Charlotte, NC:

129 W. Trade Street, Suite 400

Charlotte, NC 28202

(704) 344-6682

Greensboro, NC:

1500 Pinecroft Rd #212,

Greensboro, NC 27407

(336) 547-4188

Harassment (Race, Sex, Disability, Age, Religion, National Origin, or Pregnancy)

Harassment is a form of discrimination. If you feel you have been or are the victim of harassment, based on race, sex, disability, age, religion, national origin, or pregnancy, you should carefully document each incident and report the harassment in writing to the appropriate supervisor or upper management employee.

If your employer is covered under our federal discrimination laws, a charge of harassment must be filed with the EEOC within 180 days of the alleged act. Whether or not your employer is covered by federal law, you may have other claims under state law. To protect your rights you must file a lawsuit against your company or the harasser before the deadline of the applicable statute of limitations.

The statute of limitations can be very short. If you believe you have a basis to claim harassment on the above grounds, you should seek counsel or file a charge without delay. If you wish to have a consultation concerning harassment, please complete our online questionnaire, or call us at (336) 724-2828 today.

Family and Medical Leave Issues

FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA) Federal law requires, generally, that employers with 50 or more employees permit up to twelve weeks annual unpaid leave for employees who have been employed for one year or more, and who are seriously sick or injured, have an immediate family member who is seriously sick or injured, are adopting a child, or have just given birth.

You may qualify for this type of leave, depending on the size of your employer, the length of your employment, and your health or family situation. If you are eligible for FMLA leave and your employer denies it to you, or retaliates against you for taking leave, you have two years after the last action you contend was in violation of the Act (three years if the employer’s violation was willful) to file a private lawsuit in court against the employer. You should assume that your statute of limitations is two years, not three years, to be certain that you are filing on time. If you feel you have been wrongfully denied leave under the Act, you may contact the local office of the U.S. Department of Labor.

Please note that the filing of a charge with the U.S. Department of Labor does not prevent your statute of limitations from expiring on a private lawsuit.

If you wish to have a consultation concerning FMLA issues, please reach out to our Winston-Salem, North Carolina employment law firm today.

Disability Discrimination

Wage and Overtime Issues

If you feel that you have been denied wages, overtime compensation, or other benefits including accrued bonuses, vacation and sick leave, you may file a complaint with the North Carolina Department of Labor or the United States Department of Labor. These agencies investigate complaints which fall within the North Carolina or federal wage and hour laws (depending on the size of the employer, the type of business conducted, and the type of work done by the employee).

You have two years (three years if the employer’s violation was willful) after the date wages were due and payable to file a private lawsuit to recover unpaid wages from the employer. You should assume that your statute of limitations is two years, not three (3) years, to be certain that you are filing on time. If you feel you have been wrongfully denied wages, benefits or overtime, you should contact one of the offices listed below.

Please note that the filing of a charge with the North Carolina Department of Labor or the U.S. Department of Labor does not prevent your statute of limitations from expiring on a private lawsuit. If you wish to have a consultation concerning wage and hour issues, please give us a call at (336) 724-2828.

Contact: North Carolina Department of Labor (state minimum wage & overtime; unpaid vacation; employment of children; & deductions from paychecks) 4 West Edenton Street, Raleigh, NC 27601-1092 (919) 807-2796 (Wage & Hour, Raleigh) www.dol.state.nc.us U.S. Department of Labor (federal minimum wage & overtime; polygraph tests; family & medical leave), 4407 Bland Rd., Suite 260, Raleigh, NC 27611 (919) 790-2741 800 Briar Creek Rd., Suite CC-412, Charlotte, NC 28205 (704) 344-6302 www.dol.gov

Firing for Reporting Employer Conduct (Retaliatory Discharge)

If you feel you have been terminated, discriminated against, or retaliated against because you have pursued a claim, filed a complaint, initiated an inquiry, investigation or inspection, testified or provided information with respect to discrimination by your employer under federal law, you may file a charge of retaliation with EEOC (see above) within 180 days of the alleged act.

If you feel you have been terminated, discriminated against, or retaliated against because you have pursued a claim, filed a complaint, initiated an inquiry, investigation or inspection, testified or provided information with respect to Workers’ Compensation, OSHA, the Wage & Hour Act, the Mine Health & Safety Act, or some other administrative claim (such as discrimination against a person with sickle cell), you may file a complaint with the North Carolina Department of Labor, which investigates such claims in North Carolina.

A written complaint must be filed with the North Carolina Department of Labor within 180 days of the date of the alleged retaliatory act. If you wish to have a consultation concerning retaliatory discharge, please contact us online, or give us a call at (336) 724-2828.

Firing for an Illegal Reason (Wrongful Termination)

Breach of Contract

We Can Help You.

Please complete our Employment Law Questionnaire.

Learn More

Other Agencies

Unemployment

Exceptions to the General Rule of Employment-At-Will

General Rule of Employment-At-Will